Another pit bull incident raises questions about the danger of pit bull dogs and the people who own them.

In August, college student Ashley Debeljak walked her German Shepherd, Blair, along her neighborhood streets in Shaker Heights. While walking her dog, Ms. Debeljak noticed a red car drive up and drop off two dogs nearby. The car sped off.

The two dogs, both pit bulls, ran across the street and attacked Ms. Debeljak, biting her leg and her dog. Her screams attracted the attention of her neighbor, Gary Simon, who ran across the street with his dog, Baxter, to help Ms. Debeljak. The pit bulls turned on Mr. Simon and his dog, biting both of them before being driven off by Baxter.

Seeing the attack, another neighbor called law enforcement who captured and quarantined the two pit bulls.

Pit bull dogs commonly make headlines for dramatic and sometimes deadly attacks. Despite this, the American Humane Society argues that breed-specific legislation does not address the larger problem of why dogs bite. To reduce aggression in dogs, the Humane Society suggests owners:

  • Neuter or spay their dogs
  • Discipline and supervise dogs in healthy ways
  • Fence dogs instead of chaining or restraining them on a long lead
  • Socialize dogs by exposing them to other people, dogs and animals

Ohio holds owners strictly liable for the damage and injury caused by their dogs. Neighbors wonder if the pit bulls that attacked Ms. Debeljak and Mr. Simon were raised to fight and abandoned when no longer useful. Police continue to search for the owners.

If you are injured or attacked by a dog, speak with an experienced personal injury attorney in Cleveland.